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SiBike – Green wave for cyclists
Now things are getting down to business: following the initial test phase in the fall of 2016, the Siemens SiBike app is going live in Marburg. In the weeks between now and mid-November, dozens of cyclists will be subjecting this system – which gives priority to bicycles in city traffic – to a stress test that is taking place under realistic conditions. Beginning on October 5, 2017, SiBike is launching on a 700-meter stretch of the Erlenring road in Marburg, Germany. Dozens of volunteer "test pilots" will be helping optimize the "green wave" app. And beginning at the end of November, all Marburg residents will be able to download the SiBike app to their smartphones.

By the way: Marburg is a trendsetter. Since the project's successful start last year, numerous cities in Europe and the U.S. have already expressed interest in this technology.

Event Pictures

World premiere in Marburg, Germany

Dr. Thomas Spies, Mayor of the university town of Marburg, and Stefan Eckert, Head of the Siemens Division Mobility in South Germany, present SiBike, the "green-wave-app" for cyclist, at a press event in Marburg, Germany (from left to right).

Thanks to SiBike, cyclists in Marburg, Germany, can reach their destination sooner

In most cases, the "green waves" created by sequential switching of traffic lights are based on average car speeds and therefore offer little benefit to slower bicycle traffic. Thanks to Siemens technology, however, cyclists will in future be able to request a green signal by means of a smartphone app. Having to stop at every traffic light and then face the delay and strenuous effort of getting moving again will become a thing of the past.

Thanks to SiBike, cyclists in Marburg, Germany, can reach their destination sooner

SiBike exploits the benefits of satellite navigation technology. The cyclist's smartphone determines its position via GPS and checks whether the bike has passed a virtual trigger point at a predetermined speed.

Press Pictures: 'Green wave' for cyclists 

As the cyclist with the SiBike app approaches an intersection, the traffic light either automatically turns green in a matter of seconds or a green phase lasts longer. SiBike takes advantage of the benefits of satellite navigation technology. The cyclist's smartphone determines its position via GPS and checks whether the bike has passed a specific trigger point at a predetermined speed. When the bike passes the trigger point, the app reports its activation to the traffic control center. The traffic control center then issues a command to the traffic light controller and ensures that the cyclist gets a green light.
It's just not fair. For decades cars have been whizzing through cites, unimpeded by constant stops at red lights. The phenomenon Germans call the Grüne Welle, or "green wave" (when a string of traffic lights turns green in sequence), has become an everyday occurrence in big cities, thanks to ingenious traffic control systems. Cyclists, however, constantly have to put on the brakes for red phases. Now, those days are over. Thanks to Siemens technology, cyclists can now experience the joy of the Grüne Welle on German streets.
In the picture: Siemens projectmanager Michael Duesterwald on his way through Munich – for sure with his bike.
It's just not fair. For decades cars have been whizzing through cites, unimpeded by constant stops at red lights. The phenomenon Germans call the Grüne Welle, or "green wave" (when a string of traffic lights turns green in sequence), has become an everyday occurrence in big cities, thanks to ingenious traffic control systems. Cyclists, however, constantly have to put on the brakes for red phases. Now, those days are over. Thanks to Siemens technology, cyclists can now experience the joy of the Grüne Welle on German streets.
In the picture: Siemens projectmanager Michael Duesterwald on his way through Munich – for sure with his bike.
It's just not fair. For decades cars have been whizzing through cites, unimpeded by constant stops at red lights. The phenomenon Germans call the Grüne Welle, or "green wave" (when a string of traffic lights turns green in sequence), has become an everyday occurrence in big cities, thanks to ingenious traffic control systems. Cyclists, however, constantly have to put on the brakes for red phases. Now, those days are over. Thanks to Siemens technology, cyclists can now experience the joy of the Grüne Welle on German streets.
In the picture: Siemens projectmanager Michael Duesterwald on his way through Munich – for sure with his bike.
Every driver hopes to arrive at the next traffic light as it turns green, to catch a green wave. Carefully planned green waves ensure free-flowing traffic, reduce unnecessary braking and acceleration maneuvers, and thus make a proven contribution to reducing fine particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions. This effect is achieved by setting a series of traffic lights so that at a specific, constant traveling speed they can all be reached in a green phase.
In the picture: Siemens projectmanager Michael Duesterwald on his way through Munich – for sure with his bike.
Every driver hopes to arrive at the next traffic light as it turns green, to catch a green wave. Carefully planned green waves ensure free-flowing traffic, reduce unnecessary braking and acceleration maneuvers, and thus make a proven contribution to reducing fine particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions. This effect is achieved by setting a series of traffic lights so that at a specific, constant traveling speed they can all be reached in a green phase.
In the picture: Siemens projectmanager Michael Duesterwald on his way through Munich – for sure with his bike.
Every driver hopes to arrive at the next traffic light as it turns green, to catch a green wave. Carefully planned green waves ensure free-flowing traffic, reduce unnecessary braking and acceleration maneuvers, and thus make a proven contribution to reducing fine particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions. This effect is achieved by setting a series of traffic lights so that at a specific, constant traveling speed they can all be reached in a green phase.
In the picture: Siemens projectmanager Michael Duesterwald on his way through Munich – for sure with his bike.
As the cyclist with the SiBike app approaches an intersection, the traffic light either automatically turns green in a matter of seconds or a green phase lasts longer. SiBike takes advantage of the benefits of satellite navigation technology. The cyclist's smartphone determines its position via GPS and checks whether the bike has passed a specific trigger point at a predetermined speed. When the bike passes the trigger point, the app reports its activation to the traffic control center. The traffic control center then issues a command to the traffic light controller and ensures that the cyclist gets a green light.
In the picture: Siemens projectmanager Michael Duesterwald on his way through Munich – for sure with his bike.
As the cyclist with the SiBike app approaches an intersection, the traffic light either automatically turns green in a matter of seconds or a green phase lasts longer. SiBike takes advantage of the benefits of satellite navigation technology. The cyclist's smartphone determines its position via GPS and checks whether the bike has passed a specific trigger point at a predetermined speed. When the bike passes the trigger point, the app reports its activation to the traffic control center. The traffic control center then issues a command to the traffic light controller and ensures that the cyclist gets a green light.
In the picture: Siemens projectmanager Michael Duesterwald on his way through Munich – for sure with his bike.
As the cyclist with the SiBike app approaches an intersection, the traffic light either automatically turns green in a matter of seconds or a green phase lasts longer. SiBike takes advantage of the benefits of satellite navigation technology. The cyclist's smartphone determines its position via GPS and checks whether the bike has passed a specific trigger point at a predetermined speed. When the bike passes the trigger point, the app reports its activation to the traffic control center. The traffic control center then issues a command to the traffic light controller and ensures that the cyclist gets a green light.
It's just not fair. For decades cars have been whizzing through cites, unimpeded by constant stops at red lights. The phenomenon Germans call the Grüne Welle, or "green wave" (when a string of traffic lights turns green in sequence), has become an everyday occurrence in big cities, thanks to ingenious traffic control systems. Cyclists, however, constantly have to put on the brakes for red phases. Now, those days are over. Thanks to Siemens technology, cyclists can now experience the joy of the Grüne Welle on German streets.

Videos

Green wave for cyclists 

It’s just not fair. For decades cars have been whizzing through cites, unimpeded by constant stops at red lights. The phenomenon Germans call the Grüne Welle, or “green wave” (when a string of traffic lights turns green in sequence), has become an everyday occurrence in big cities, thanks to ingenious traffic control systems. Cyclists, however, constantly have to put on the brakes for red phases. Now, those days are over. Thanks to Siemens technology, cyclists can now experience the joy of the Green wave on German streets. 

The english version of the SiBike animation is available at minute 06:19. 

Further Information

Contact

Eva Haupenthal

Siemens Mobility GmbH

+49 (89) 636-24421

Evelyn Necker

Siemens Mobility GmbH

+49 (721) 992-1171

Link to this page
www.siemens.com/press/sibike