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The sensor-controlled parking management system – parking space without searching
According to a study, every car driver wastes about 100 hours a year on average looking for a parking space and causes one third of traffic in city centers. That costs time, gas and nerves. The Siemens innovation is making targeted use of the opportunities offered by digitalization: smart sensors, smart software and smart data interpretation. The benefits are clear: smart infrastructures save time, protect the environment and ultimately improve the quality of life for city dwellers. The result: an end to superfluous and hazardous traffic searching for a parking space, and optimum use of parking spaces within the city. A first pilot project has now started in Berlin.

Siemens starts pilot project in Berlin to test radar-based parking space detection

An initial pilot project has already been installed on the Bundesallee in Berlin for test and demonstration purposes. Each sensor in the network scans an area of approximately 30 meters from above like a flashlight, covering five to eight cars. The results of the test will be available in 2016, and are expected to demonstrate the viability of the system. The pilot installation is part of the federally funded Renewably mobile project in which Siemens is exploring the potential of sensor-controlled management systems for roadside parking and electric recharging points in cooperation with the Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment in Berlin (SenStadtUm), the VMZ Berlin Betreibergesellschaft mbH, the Institute for Climate Protection, Energy and Mobility (IKEM) and the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI).

Press Pictures

Where's that free parking spot? Smart Siemens street lamps know

Siemens and its partners have developed a radar sensor system that offers drivers a quick, hassle-free way to find vacant parking spaces in the urban jungle. An initial pilot project has already been installed on the Bundesallee in Berlin for test and demonstration purposes. The pilot installation is part of the federally funded Renewably mobile project in which Siemens is exploring the potential of sensor-controlled management systems for roadside parking and electric recharging points in cooperation with the Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment in Berlin (SenStadtUm), the VMZ Berlin Betreibergesellschaft mbH, the Institute for Climate Protection, Energy and Mobility (IKEM) and the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI).

Siemens tests its first ever radar-sensor parking search technology in Berlin

As part of the City2.e 2.0 research project, Siemens is demonstrating a faster way to find curbside parking in cooperation with the Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment in Berlin (SenStadtUm), the VMZ Berlin Betreibergesellschaft mbH, the Institute for Climate Protection, Energy and Mobility (IKEM), and the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). Street lamps on a 200 meter long section of road in Berlin Friedenau have been fitted with radar sensors that continuously monitor urban parking areas and report free parking spaces and the number of occupied e-parking spots to parking-area management software.

Siemens tests its first ever radar-sensor parking search technology in Berlin

For test and demonstration purposes, Siemens has installed radar sensors on street lamps in Berlin to help with the search for vacant parking spaces. Each sensor in the network scans an area of approximately 30 meters from above like a flashlight, covering five to eight cars. The results of the test will be available in 2016, and are expected to demonstrate the viability of the system.

Siemens has developed a radar sensor system that offers drivers a quick, hassle-free way to find vacant parking spaces in the urban jungle

The concept: radar sensors, installed either in or on street lamps and the walls of buildings continuously monitor urban parking areas and report any free parking spaces and the number of occupied e-parking spaces to the city's traffic information center. The system does not identify specific people or vehicles and the sensors do not record any personal data. The data the system collects can either be used by the traffic information center for its own information services or forwarded through a data interface – an app operator, for instance – so that drivers can always find a free parking space, simply using their smartphone, tablet or a navigation device.

Siemens starts pilot project in Berlin to test radar-based parking space detection

As part of the City2.e 2.0 research project, Siemens is demonstrating a faster way to find curbside parking in cooperation with the Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment in Berlin (SenStadtUm), the VMZ Berlin Betreibergesellschaft mbH, the Institute for Climate Protection, Energy and Mobility (IKEM), and the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). The first pilot installation on the Bundesallee in Berlin was now ceremonially commissioned.

Siemens starts pilot project in Berlin to test radar-based parking space detection

As part of the City2.e 2.0 research project, Siemens is demonstrating a faster way to find curbside parking in cooperation with the Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment in Berlin (SenStadtUm), the VMZ Berlin Betreibergesellschaft mbH, the Institute for Climate Protection, Energy and Mobility (IKEM), and the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). The first pilot installation on the Bundesallee in Berlin was now ceremonially commissioned.

Siemens starts pilot project in Berlin to test radar-based parking space detection

As part of the City2.e 2.0 research project, Siemens is demonstrating a faster way to find curbside parking in cooperation with the Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment in Berlin (SenStadtUm), the VMZ Berlin Betreibergesellschaft mbH, the Institute for Climate Protection, Energy and Mobility (IKEM), and the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). The first pilot installation on the Bundesallee in Berlin was now ceremonially commissioned.

Siemens starts pilot project in Berlin to test radar-based parking space detection

As part of the City2.e 2.0 research project, Siemens is demonstrating a faster way to find curbside parking in cooperation with the Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment in Berlin (SenStadtUm), the VMZ Berlin Betreibergesellschaft mbH, the Institute for Climate Protection, Energy and Mobility (IKEM), and the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). The first pilot installation on the Bundesallee in Berlin was now ceremonially commissioned.

Siemens starts pilot project in Berlin to test radar-based parking space detection

As part of the City2.e 2.0 research project, Siemens is demonstrating a faster way to find curbside parking in cooperation with the Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment in Berlin (SenStadtUm), the VMZ Berlin Betreibergesellschaft mbH, the Institute for Climate Protection, Energy and Mobility (IKEM), and the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). The first pilot installation on the Bundesallee in Berlin was now ceremonially commissioned.

Siemens starts pilot project in Berlin to test radar-based parking space detection

As part of the City2.e 2.0 research project, Siemens is demonstrating a faster way to find curbside parking in cooperation with the Senate Department for Urban Development and the Environment in Berlin (SenStadtUm), the VMZ Berlin Betreibergesellschaft mbH, the Institute for Climate Protection, Energy and Mobility (IKEM), and the Robotics Innovation Center of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI). The first pilot installation on the Bundesallee in Berlin was now ceremonially commissioned.

Further Information

Siemens develops sensor-controlled parking management system

According to the latest Apcoa study, motorists drive an average of 4.5 kilometers before they finally find somewhere to park. That costs time, gasoline and nerves. The new sensor-controlled parking management system from Siemens is helping to optimize the use of urban parking facilities and radically reduce the congestion caused by motorists searching for a space.

Infographics

The sensor-controlled parking management system – parking space without searching

Siemens' new sensor-controlled parking management system can help to optimize usage of urban parking spaces and radically reduce traffic in towns and cities caused by drivers searching for a place to park. Sensor networks gather information on the parking situation in the town and this is then forwarded to motorists to help them find a vacant parking spot. The data also flows into a town's parking management control center where it is processed by an intelligent parking space management system with the aim of achieving a long-term improvement in the parking situation.

The sensor-controlled parking management system – parking space without searching

Siemens' new sensor-controlled parking management system can help to optimize usage of urban parking spaces and radically reduce traffic in towns and cities caused by drivers searching for a place to park. Sensor networks gather information on the parking situation in the town and this is then forwarded to motorists to help them find a vacant parking spot. The data also flows into a town's parking management control center where it is processed by an intelligent parking space management system with the aim of achieving a long-term improvement in the parking situation.

Press Pictures: The sensor-controlled parking management system – parking space without searching

The overhead system detects the blocking of cycle paths, bus lanes, garages and driveways by illegally parked vehicles and passes this information on to the control center.
A sensor network – based on a newly developed overhead radar sensor – constantly monitors parking space and reports the occupancy status of parking slots to a parking control center. The driver can enter his destination via a smartphone or navigation device and receive real-time information about the parking space situation there.
Measures can be initiated immediately in the event of parking violations with an impact on safety: for example, nearby supervisory staff can be promptly informed and can clarify the situation personally. And of course, less traffic means more safety.
Measures can be initiated immediately in the event of parking violations with an impact on safety: for example, nearby supervisory staff can be promptly informed and can clarify the situation personally. And of course, less traffic means more safety.
A sensor network – based on a newly developed overhead radar sensor – constantly monitors parking space and reports the occupancy status of parking slots to a parking control center. What is so special about this innovation is that the software works with adaptive systems. It recognizes recurring cycles in the parking space situation - for example at certain times of day or on certain days of the week. It then works out forecasts for road users, for example concerning the expected parking space situation at their destination or alternative routes through areas with lower volumes of traffic.
The system can integrate various sensor types and technologies, which means it can be ideally adapted to the individual (e.g. topographical) requirements of any urban area. In comparison to ground sensors, overhead sensors can not only capture the occupancy of individually marked parking spaces but also monitor several spaces at the same time as well as the adjacent area (cycle paths, sidewalks or the road). Radar technology is a very reliable detection method which, unlike optical sensors, is not impaired by light or weather conditions.
The overhead sensor systems can be easily mounted on or in streetlights, so there is no need for major interference in the infrastructure. The sensors can be screwed onto the street light pole or integrated in the lamp housing itself.The radar system works without image capture. The privacy rights of individual road users are therefore respected.
Marcus Zwick, Head of Innovation management Mobility Division/ Siemens AG.
Florian Poprawa, Head Hardware Development of the parking project at Siemens AG.
Marcus Zwick, Head of Innovation management Mobility Division/ Siemens AG (left). Florian Poprawa, Head Hardware Development of the parking project at Siemens AG (right).
Looking for a place to park takes time, is aggravating and impacts on the environment. Depending on the size of the city, the number of cars hunting for a parking space can make up almost one-third of the entire traffic volume. That's about to change!

Videos

Smart Parking

City motorists drive an average of some 4.5 kilometers before finally finding a place to park - a nerve-wracking process that consumes time and fuel.  The new parking management system from Siemens is designed to optimize the utilization of urban parking capacity, thus dramatically reducing parking-related traffic in cities.  A sensor network continually monitors parking facilities and reports availability status to a parking control center. The system also detects illegally parked vehicles which are obstructing bicycle routes, bus lanes or driveways leading to garages or rear parking lots.

Further Information

Contact

Ellen Schramke

Siemens Mobility GmbH

+49 (30) 386-22370