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eHighway – Solutions for electrified road freight transport

Electrified road freight traffic – the eHighway by Siemens

Shifting freight transport to rail has its limitations. Therefore, a share of this transport will need to be carried out by trucks that combine reliable service with minimum environmental impact. The eHighway system is twice as efficient as conventional internal combustion engines. This Siemens Mobility innovation supplies trucks with power from an overhead contact line. This reduces local air pollution and contributes significantly to the decarbonization of the transport sector.

Press Pictures

Siemens eHighway: Test drive

eHighway is a reliable and environmentally friendly alternative to standard truck transport that supplies trucks with power from an overhead contact line. This means that not only is energy consumption cut by half, but local air pollution is reduced too, making the technology twice as efficient as internal combustion engines.

Siemens eHighway: Test drive

eHighway is a reliable and environmentally friendly alternative to standard truck transport that supplies trucks with power from an overhead contact line. This means that not only is energy consumption cut by half, but local air pollution is reduced too, making the technology twice as efficient as internal combustion engines.

Federal Environment Minister Hendricks tests eHighway

On April 11, 2017, Federal Environment Minister Barbara Hendricks saw for herself what eHighway, Siemens' overhead line system for trucks, is all about during a test drive. Siemens presented the technology on its test route in Groß Dölln in northern Germany.
eHighway is a technology that makes freight transport on the roads more sustainable and environmentally friendly by supplying trucks with power from an overhead contact line. This means that not only is energy consumption cut by half, but local air pollution is reduced too, making the technology twice as efficient as internal combustion engines.
Photo (from left to right): Federal Environment Minister Barbara Hendricks, Dr. Jochen Eickholt, CEO of the Siemens Mobility Division

Federal Environment Minister Hendricks tests eHighway

On April 11, 2017, Federal Environment Minister Barbara Hendricks saw for herself what eHighway, Siemens' overhead line system for trucks, is all about during a test drive. Siemens presented the technology on its test route in Groß Dölln in northern Germany.
eHighway is a technology that makes freight transport on the roads more sustainable and environmentally friendly by supplying trucks with power from an overhead contact line. This means that not only is energy consumption cut by half, but local air pollution is reduced too, making the technology twice as efficient as internal combustion engines.

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

In the follow-up project, ENUBA 2, Siemens entered into a partnership with Scania, a Swedish company. The focus is on optimizing the integration of the drive system and pantograph into the vehicle and on providing the necessary traffic control systems.
The picture shows a driving scene at the extended eHighway test track in Groß Dölln, Germany.

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

In the follow-up project, ENUBA 2, Siemens entered into a partnership with Scania, a Swedish company. The focus is on optimizing the integration of the drive system and pantograph into the vehicle and on providing the necessary traffic control systems.
The picture shows a driving scene at the extended eHighway test track in Groß Dölln, Germany.

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

In the follow-up project, ENUBA 2, Siemens entered into a partnership with Scania, a Swedish company. The focus is on optimizing the integration of the drive system and pantograph into the vehicle and on providing the necessary traffic control systems.
The picture shows a driving scene at the extended eHighway test track in Groß Dölln, Germany.

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

In the follow-up project, ENUBA 2, Siemens entered into a partnership with Scania, a Swedish company. The focus is on optimizing the integration of the drive system and pantograph into the vehicle and on providing the necessary traffic control systems.
The picture shows a driving scene at the extended eHighway test track in Groß Dölln, Germany.

Siemens tests eHighway system in California

In California Siemens has teamed up with the automaker Volvo and local truck retrofitters in order to carry out a pilot project with the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD). The plan is to set up a zero-emission corridor on Interstate Highway 710, between the two sea ports and the inland railway hubs around 30 kilometers away, where shuttle transport using e-trucks will relieve the burden on this smog-plagued region. Project planning is already underway.
The picture shows a driving scene at the extended eHighway test track in Groß Dölln, Germany

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

For the second research project a new, extended test track was commissioned in Groß Dölln, Germany. It is tailored to mirror real operating conditions. A bend was added to the track, along with a newly developed contact wire that is adjusted to the shape of the bend and allows vehicles to keep traveling at speeds of up to 90 km/h. Two more features found on most highways were also installed: a gantry and a road sign supported by a cantilever. Since the contact wire has to remain a safe distance beneath the road signs, the catenaries and carrying cable were lowered so that the pantograph can remain in constant contact, even when traveling at full speed.

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

For the second research project a new, extended test track was commissioned in Groß Dölln, Germany. It is tailored to mirror real operating conditions. A bend was added to the track, along with a newly developed contact wire that is adjusted to the shape of the bend and allows vehicles to keep traveling at speeds of up to 90 km/h. Two more features found on most highways were also installed: a gantry and a road sign supported by a cantilever. Since the contact wire has to remain a safe distance beneath the road signs, the catenaries and carrying cable were lowered so that the pantograph can remain in constant contact, even when traveling at full speed.

Intelligent pantograph enables full vehicle flexibility

As soon as the scanner detects an overhead contact line, the pantographs are ready to connect and, depending on the operating mode, can be extended automatically or manually by pressing a button.

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

For the second research project a new, extended test track was commissioned in Groß Dölln, Germany. It is tailored to mirror real operating conditions. A bend was added to the track, along with a newly developed contact wire that is adjusted to the shape of the bend and allows vehicles to keep traveling at speeds of up to 90 km/h. Two more features found on most highways were also installed: a gantry and a road sign supported by a cantilever. Since the contact wire has to remain a safe distance beneath the road signs, the catenaries and carrying cable were lowered so that the pantograph can remain in constant contact, even when traveling at full speed.

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

In the follow-up project, ENUBA 2, Siemens entered into a partnership with Scania, a Swedish company. The focus is on optimizing the integration of the drive system and pantograph into the vehicle and on providing the necessary traffic control systems.
The picture shows a driving scene at the extended eHighway test track in Groß Dölln, Germany

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

In the follow-up project, ENUBA 2, Siemens entered into a partnership with Scania, a Swedish company. The focus is on optimizing the integration of the drive system and pantograph into the vehicle and on providing the necessary traffic control systems.
The picture shows a driving scene at the extended eHighway test track in Groß Dölln, Germany

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

In the follow-up project, ENUBA 2, Siemens entered into a partnership with Scania, a Swedish company. The focus is on optimizing the integration of the drive system and pantograph into the vehicle and on providing the necessary traffic control systems.

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

In the follow-up project, ENUBA 2, Siemens entered into a partnership with Scania, a Swedish company. The focus is on optimizing the integration of the drive system and pantograph into the vehicle and on providing the necessary traffic control systems.

Siemens and Scania are conducting joint research into the electrification of road freight traffic

In the follow-up project, ENUBA 2, Siemens entered into a partnership with Scania, a Swedish company. The focus is on optimizing the integration of the drive system and pantograph into the vehicle and on providing the necessary traffic control systems.

HGVs with hybrid drive technology for use on electrified routes

The HGVs are always driven by an electric motor. On electrified routes, the electric motor takes its power from an overhead contact line. The pantograph transmits the power from the overhead contact line to the HGV's drive system. 
The HGV is also equipped with a powerful diesel engine for non-electrified routes. With optimum efficiency, this engine drives an onboard generator which in turn generates the power required to drive the electric motor. When overtaking other vehicles or operating on non-electrified routes, the vehicle can change over to conventional diesel engine operation or operation on an energy storage system.

Siemens tests electric-powered system for heavy good vehicles

If there is no overhead line, the HGVs automatically switch over to Diesel-hybrid power train
Electric powered HGVs can rely on its additional diesel-electric power trains. On highways and roads without catenary system, the diesel engine's output is transmitted to the generator, which in turn powers the downstream electric motor turning the cardan shaft.

Intelligent pantograph enables full vehicle flexibility 

Siemens has developed an actively moveable pantograph. This enables automatic connection to/disconnection from the overhead contact line at speeds of up to 90 km/h and also automatic compensation of all vehicle movements within the electrified lane. Depending on the operation mode, the pantographs can be raised or lowered automatically or even manually at the touch of a button and enable full vehicle flexibility in comparison with trolley buses or hybrid trucks in open-cast mining.

Siemens tests electric-powered system for heavy good vehicles

In the context of the research project ENUBA (Electromobility in heavy commercial vehicles to reduce the environmental impact on densely populated areas), Siemens produced an holistic concept for the electrification of HGV traffic by means catenaries and to test the technical feasibility of the system on a specially built test track in the north of Berlin, Germany.

Further Information

eHighway in Germany

Copyright: Scania CV AB

In August 2017, Siemens Mobility was commissioned by the state of Hesse to build an overhead contact line for electrified freight transport on a ten-kilometer stretch of autobahn. With this field trial, the eHighway is being tested on a public highway in Germany for the first time. The system is installed on the A5 autobahn between the Zeppelinheim/Cargo City Süd interchange at the Frankfurt Airport and the Darmstadt/Weiterstadt interchange.
In March 2018, a further contract was awarded by the Research and Development Center of the University Kiel for the construction of a five-kilometer eHighway on the A1 autobahn between the Reinfeld and Lübeck interchanges.

Infographics

First eHighway in Germany

Siemens Mobility supplied a pilot system for electrified road freight transport for Hessen Mobil

Press Pictures

Inauguration of the first ehighway in Germany

Siemens Mobility supplied a pilot system for electrified road freight transport for Hessen Mobil.
In the picture: Rita Schwarzelühr-Sutter; Parliamentary State Secretary at the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety

Inauguration of the first ehighway in Germany

Siemens Mobility supplied a pilot system for electrified road freight transport for Hessen Mobil.

Construction of the eHighway on the A1 autobahn

In March 2018 Siemens Mobility was commissioned by the Research and Development Center of the University Kiel to build a five-kilometer eHighway on the A1 autobahn between the Reinfeld and Lübeck interchanges.

Construction of the eHighway on the A1 autobahn

In March 2018 Siemens Mobility was commissioned by the Research and Development Center of the University Kiel to build a five-kilometer eHighway on the A1 autobahn between the Reinfeld and Lübeck interchanges.

Construction of the eHighway on the A1 autobahn

In March 2018 Siemens Mobility was commissioned by the Research and Development Center of the University Kiel to build a five-kilometer eHighway on the A1 autobahn between the Reinfeld and Lübeck interchanges.

Construction of the eHighway on the A1 autobahn

In March 2018 Siemens Mobility was commissioned by the Research and Development Center of the University Kiel to build a five-kilometer eHighway on the A1 autobahn between the Reinfeld and Lübeck interchanges.

Further Information

eHighway in USA

In November 2017, Siemens Mobility installed and tested a two-mile-long overhead contact line system for hybrid electric trucks near the U.S. ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, two of the largest ports in the country.

Infographics

Siemens and the "South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD)" are running a one-mile, zero-emission eHighway demonstration in the Californian city of Carson, U.S., near the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Three trucks hauling freight are running along the stretch of highway which uses Siemens technology to electrify select highway lanes via an overhead catenary system. This catenary system supplies the trucks with electric power, similar to how modern-day trolleys or streetcars are powered on many city streets. The system also allows for truck operation outside of the electrified sections of infrastructure.

eHighway in Sweden

The first eHighway system on a public road was inaugurated in June 2016 in Sweden. For two years, a Siemens Mobility catenary system for trucks was tested on a two-kilometer stretch of the E16 highway north of Stockholm. The system trial employed two diesel-hybrid trucks manufactured by Scania and adapted, in collaboration with Siemens Mobility, to operate with the catenary system. During the two-year trial, Sweden's transport authority Trafikverket and the district of Gävleborg gathered data to see whether the Siemens eHighway system is suitable for future commercial use and further expansion. As part of its climate protection strategy, Sweden has committed to having its transport sector independent of fossil fuels by 2030.

Press Pictures

World's first eHighway opens in Sweden

The first eHighway system on a public road opened in June 2016. For the coming two years, a Siemens catenary system for trucks will be tested on a two-kilometer stretch of the E16 highway north of Stockholm. The trial will use two diesel hybrid vehicles manufactured by Scania and adapted, in collaboration with Siemens, to operate under the catenary system. During the two-year trial, Sweden's Transport Administration Trafikverket and Gävleborg County want to create a knowledge base on whether the Siemens eHighway system is suitable for future commercial use and further deployment. As part of its climate protection strategy, Sweden has committed to having a fossil fuel independent transport sector by 2030.

World's first eHighway opens in Sweden

The first eHighway system on a public road opened in June 2016. For the coming two years, a Siemens catenary system for trucks will be tested on a two-kilometer stretch of the E16 highway north of Stockholm. The trial will use two diesel hybrid vehicles manufactured by Scania and adapted, in collaboration with Siemens, to operate under the catenary system. During the two-year trial, Sweden's Transport Administration Trafikverket and Gävleborg County want to create a knowledge base on whether the Siemens eHighway system is suitable for future commercial use and further deployment. As part of its climate protection strategy, Sweden has committed to having a fossil fuel independent transport sector by 2030.

World's first eHighway opens in Sweden

The first eHighway system on a public road opened in June 2016. For the coming two years, a Siemens catenary system for trucks will be tested on a two-kilometer stretch of the E16 highway north of Stockholm. The trial will use two diesel hybrid vehicles manufactured by Scania and adapted, in collaboration with Siemens, to operate under the catenary system. During the two-year trial, Sweden's Transport Administration Trafikverket and Gävleborg County want to create a knowledge base on whether the Siemens eHighway system is suitable for future commercial use and further deployment. As part of its climate protection strategy, Sweden has committed to having a fossil fuel independent transport sector by 2030.

Contact

Eva Haupenthal

Siemens Mobility GmbH

+49 (89) 636-24421

Link to this page
www.siemens.com/press/ehighway